Category Archives: Video

Molly Erin Sarlé: Mountain Man to tour again, but not until next year [Videos]

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Mountain Man at the 2010 Solid Sound Festival, North Adams, Massachusetts. (Steven P. Marsh/willyoumissme.com)

If your hopes were dashed when Mountain Man did only a one-off reunion set this summer despite strong hints from the long-dormant trio earlier this year suggesting something much more extensive might be in the works, take note!

The trio is will do a full tour, but not until 2018, Mountain Man member Molly Erin Sarlé says.

She broke the news to a fan during a conversation after her opening set for Big Thief at the Music Hall of Williamsburg on Sept. 11.

Sarlé said she and her band mates had “so much fun” doing their set at the Eaux Claires festival in June, that they have agreed to do a tour next year.

Click through to the jump for videos and more. Continue reading

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NEW VIDEO: Drink a little ‘Kool Aid’ with The Lords of Liechtenstein

The Lords of Liechtenstein perform with Austin Hughes, left, of M. Shanghai, at Jalopy in Red Hook, Brooklyn, on Dec. 6, 2014. (Steven P. Marsh/willyoumissme.com)

The Lords of Liechtenstein’s Rauchwerk brothers perform with Austin Hughes, left, of M. Shanghai, at Jalopy in Red Hook, Brooklyn, on Dec. 6, 2014. (Steven P. Marsh/willyoumissme.com)

You can accuse New Jersey-born, Brooklyn-based band The Lords of Liechtenstein of a lot of things, including having questionable fashion taste (I have just three words: Argyle. Sweater. Vests.) and possessing endless charm, humor, and musical talent.

But you could never call the folky band — brothers and Holmdel, New Jersey, natives Dan and Noah Rauchwerk and three band mates — subtle.

The new video for “Kool Aid,” from their latest album, “Downhill Ride to Joyland,” is a perfect example.

Their team describes it this way:

Their new unreleased music video “Kool Aid” was inspired by cult leader Jim Jones and is meant to be a satirical take on the power that charismatic figures hold over us. The video translates that theme to the present day and is critical of how such leaders cause us to accept poisonous ideologies. “Drink the kool aid.”

But let’s just say they seem to have a someone much, much more contemporary than Jim Jones in mind as the inspiration for this video. (Clue: Pay attention to the wording on the paper cups! If that doesn’t make it clear, I have just one word for you: SAD!)

Watch and enjoy here:

If you like what you see and hear and want to see the Lords live, your next opportunity in the New York City area will be Wednesday, Oct. 18, at the Schimmel Center in Manhattan, in support of Uncle Bonsai. They’ll be at The Turning Point in Piermont, New York, on Sunday, Dec. 10, performing on a 4 p.m. bill with The Levins. Check out their full schedule on Facebook.

 

 

Jamie Block and Caroline Doctorow: Longtime friends forge musical partnership at Union Arts Center Saturday

Caroline Doctorow and Jamie Block

Caroline Doctorow and Jamie Block

Caroline Doctorow considers herself a classic folksinger.

Jamie Block‘s a product of the Anti-Folk revolution.

You might not think they’d have a lot in common, but if you want to find out how these two artists manage to walk their separate paths without losing sight of each other, check them out in a rare Rockland County concert appearance at Sparkill’s Union Arts Center on Saturday, March 19.

What you’re likely find is that it’s a natural pairing — they’ve been friends and mutual admirers for a quarter century

The pair spent a little time with Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone? the other day to talk about their friendship , Doctorow begins recounting how she met Block.

“I think I met Jamie when,” she began, only to be interrupted off by Block — as he had warned he probably would wind up doing.

IF YOU GO

What: Caroline Doctorow and Jamie Block in concert

When: 8 p.m., Saturday, March 19

Where: Union Arts Center, 2 Union Ave., Sparkill, New York

Tickets: $20 in advance, $25 at the door. GO HERE TO BUY ONLINE. More info at info@unionartscenter.com or 845-359-0258

Interview continues after the jump. Continue reading

Surreal ‘City of Glass’ leaps from novel to New York stage

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Playwright Edward Einhorn, left, and novelist Paul Auster on the set for “City of Glass” at the New Ohio Theatre. (Photo by Gil Sperling)

If playwright Edward Einhorn hadn’t been able to think like a gumshoe, he never would have gotten permission to make a theater adaptation of Brooklyn novelist Paul Auster‘s “City of Glass” — one of the best, and most surreal, detective-style novels of the last half century.

But luck and persistence were on the 45-year-old Einhorn’s side, who used his amateur detective skills to put himself and his idea in front of the 69-year-old author.

“I sought out Paul,” he tells Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone? in an exclusive telephone interview.

“I found out where he was going to be and I approached him about doing it. To my pleasure he was interested and very responsive. … I figured I would talk to him for a minute or two and just introduce the idea. I wasn’t going to take up too much of his time. But he actually pursued it with a lot more questions and we talked about it longer than expected.

“He seemed very open to the idea.”

“City of Glass,” published in 1986, was the first of three short novels in Auster’s “New York Trilogy.” It tells a surreal story of Daniel Quinn, a writer, who gets a call from someone who thinks he’s a private detective named Paul Auster. The chance call launches a surreal, only-in-New-York narrative that raises questions about sanity, identity, and reality.

It was an instant cult hit and catapulted Auster into literary superstardom at age 39.

Video and ticket discount code after the jump.

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Glenn Kotche revisited: Spectaculs in concert with So Percussion

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Glenn Kotche

I have to confess that Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche‘s forays into New Music were beginning to rub me the wrong way.

Maybe it was the Delta faucet commercial that set me on edge. I can’t say for sure.

But it had begun to feel to me that he was trying far too hard to prove that he’s not just the drummer in one of the world’s best rock bands. He seemed to be crying out to be taken seriously as a percussionist with depth and breadth as well as great rock chops.

His most recent serious album, “Adventureland” (Cantaloupe Music, 2014), is well done and pleasant, but for some reason it never really grabbed me. Maybe I just wasn’t in the right frame of mind to appreciate it.

When I got the opportunity to attend a concert on Saturday in Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall the featured some of his work,  I decided to open my ears again.

I’m glad I did. Kotche’s work was a big part of what made the evening a spectacular musical event.

The evening opened with some older work — four selections from his 2011 Drumkit Quartets — performed by So Percussion (Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting) alone.

So  Percussion clearly had an enormous amount of fun with the compositions. All of them featured a wide array of drums and myriad other percussion. The first, “Drumkit Quartet #50 (Leffinge, Chicago), kicked off with each member of the ensemble playing a hand-cranked siren, while the third, “Drumkit Quartet #51 (Tokyo, Brisbane, Berlin),” featured Japanese rock band Cibo Matto‘s Yuka Honda (who is married to Wilco guitarist Nels Cline) reciting haiku.

It’s no surprise that So  Percussion knew the pieces well, as the ensemble has recorded a “Drumkit Quartets” album due out Feb. 26 on Cantaloupe.

Kotche joined the ensemble for the world premiere of “Migrations,” a Carnegie Hall commission, that testified dramatically to Kotche’s admiration for minimalist composer Steve Reich with rhythms playfully produced on marimbas struck with fingertips and combs.

A hard-driving “Drumkit Quartet #1,” featuring a strobe-like animated film by Patrick Burns, closed the Kotche section of the show in memorable fashion.

The evening also featured a short piece by composer Steven Mackey, “Before It Is Time,” sung by Shara Worden, a performer and composer who works in rock and New Music like Kotche. (She performs in the rock world as My Brightest Diamond), in its New York premiere.

A 45-minute Worden song cycle, “Timeline” — commissioned jointly by Carnegie Hall and the University of Texas at Austin — closed out the evening. Worden sang and, at times played the guitar, a distracting move that took the focus off of the rhythms and interesting tonal qualities of the percussion, which included a mean steel drum number played by Quillen.

 

‘Surface Noise’: A self-effacing title for Jennifer O’Connor’s brilliant new album

The cover of Jennifer O'Connor's album "Surface Noise" (March 4, 2016, Kiam Records) features an ambitious abstract painting, "There 48," by Brooklyn artist Joan LeMay.

The cover of Jennifer O’Connor’s album “Surface Noise” (March 4, 2016, Kiam Records) features an ambitious abstract painting, “There 48,” by Brooklyn artist Joan LeMay.

I’ve never been one to make best-of lists when it comes to music. I enjoy so much of what I hear that it’s difficult to pick favorites.

So I won’t say that Jennifer O’Connor‘s forthcoming album, “Surface Noise,” out March 4, 2016, on Kiam Records, is a sure-fire pick for my best of 2016 list, since I’m not likely to compile one.

I can say it’s the best new album I’ve heard so far in this still-young year — and I fully expect to feel that way about it when this year is winding down.

“Surface Noise” is packed with 12 songs that explore love, loss, and the challenges of life with a casual brilliance about this album that makes it the best work this talented artist has produced so far.

ORDER JENNIFER O’CONNOR’S “SURFACE NOISE” VIA KIAM RECORDS NOW — GO HERE

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Looking for a hot time on a cold night? Check out Amy Lynn & The Gunshow on Wednesday (Video)

Amy Lynn & The Gunshow blasts into 54 Below at 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25.

Amy Lynn & The Gunshow blasts into 54 Below at 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25.

Amy Lynn & The Gunshow is a band I’ve been trying to catch life for ages, but every time they have a gig, it seems I’m already booked somewhere else.

Hot dam, that’s finally changing — on Wednesday night, Feb. 25, when Amy Lynn Hamlin and her six cohorts (including her husband — sorry, she’s taken! — Alex Hamlin on sax) hit the stage at Manhattan’s 54 Below for a late show.

The band’s tagline is “Horns, Soul & Sass.” And, judging from the excellent debut album, “Don’t Trip on the Glitter,” available on Bandcamp, iTunes, Amazon, and most other online music sellers, that sums it up perfectly.

Amy Lynn may not be able to change the weather, but her powerful, sultry singing will definitely raise your temperature during the show.

Don’t take my word for it. Sample her sound with a free download of “Chandelier,” a killer cover of Sia’s song. It’s just Amy Lynn and Alex on this track,  and it’s excellent. Tap or click here for more info on that.

It sounds like Amy Lynn has some surprises in store for the 54 Below crowd, so be ready for anything. She’s been looking for some special tunes to cover and says James Jackson Jr. and LaDonna Burns (aka The Black-Ups) are appearing on the bill, too.

The show isn’t sold out yet, but seats are going fast. Prices start at $35 (the $25 seats are gone). But you can save $5 on the cover by using code GUN5. Tap or click here to buy ticket now. You won’t regret it.

54 Below, a supper club with a $25 per person minimum in addition to the cover charge, is in the cellar below Studio 54 at 254 West 54th Street, Manhattan. Call 646-476-3551 for information.