Tag Archives: suicide

Scenes from a fund-raiser: Benefit for Lucinda’s Kids, Night 1

The first night of the two-night Benefit for Lucinda’s Kids was a great night of almost 7 hours of entertainment on Sunday, April 29 at The Bowery Electric, with a great crowd and a fantastic lineup of artists, including Marah, Jesse Malin, Jimmy Gnecco, Willie Nile (who almost missed the show because of a delayed flight from Chicago), Jim Boggia, Aaron Lee Tasjan, Michelle Casillas (Ursa Minor), Mystie and more. As of Sunday night, there were still tickets left for the second night of the benefit to raise money for the trust fund that will benefit the two teenagers left behind when their mom, super music fan Lucinda Gallagher, committed suicide last December.

Here’s the Monday lineup.

Monday, April 30, doors at 7 p.m.
Tommy Stinson (The Replacements)
HR (Bad Brains)
Alan Vega (Suicide)
James Maddock
Aaron Lee Tasjan

Tickets are $20 and available here.

And here’s what you missed on Sunday.

Jesse Malin

Many, many more photos after the jump.
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Marah’s Dave Bielanko and Christine Smith returning to New York for benefit show

Marah: Christine Smith and Dave Bielanko

In recent years, the wild, Philadelphia-born rock band Marah has stripped down. Essentially, it’s now just Dave Bielanko and Christine Smith at the core, performing as a duo at time and recruiting bandmates for bigger shows.

After a stint in Brooklyn, they’ve have moved into an old farmhouse in the wilds of central Pennsylvania, with a phone line for incoming calls only. They’ve been working on a couple of records, about which more in our next post.

But for now, let’s focus on this week. Marah is coming out of wilderness to do a few shows, one of which is this Sunday, April 29, at The Bowery Electric at 327 Bowery in Manhattan.

They’re performing on the first night of two-evening benefit concert for a friend who took her own life last year and left two teenage children behind.

Marah to play at Benefit for Lucinda’s Kids

It looks like this benefit will be a real blast, with a lot of other amazing artists.

It’s all to raise money for the children of Lucinda Gallagher, a 37-year-old super music fan from Hoboken who took her life in December.

In an exclusive Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone? interview (which we’ll share fully in our next post), Christine spoke about Marah’s connection with Gallagher:

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Gone too soon: Vic Chesnutt dead at 45 (UPDATE: Donate to help Vic’s family)

Vic Chesnutt wheels into the spotlight at the Bowery Ballroom in NYC on June 16, 2009. (Photos copyright 20009, Steven P. Marsh)

UPDATE: Longtime Vic Chesnutt collaborator Kristin Hersh has set up a web page for donations to help Vic’s survivors. Click here to donate. Kristin promises that all proceeds will go to the family to help cover the costs of Vic’s hospitalization and burial.

Singer-songwriter Vic Chesnutt, 45, who was confined to a wheelchair after breaking his neck in a car accident at age 18, died today after lapsing into a coma after taking an overdose of muscle relaxants earlier this week, family spokesman, Jem Cohen told The New York Times.

Vic's energy came out in a howl.

Kristin Hersh, a frequent collaborator with Chesnutt, said on Twitter that it was suicide. “No one knows much: another suicide attempt, looks bad, coma–if he survives, there may be brain damage,” Hersh Tweeted yesterday. “This time, it’s real scary: *this* time, he left a note, *this* time, he asked them to call me.”

The Athens, Ga., -based performer, had attempted suicide in the past. But the lyrics of the songs on his new album, In the Cut, seemed to signal a positive outlook on life. He even wrote directly about suicide in “Flirted With You All My Life,” writing “Everywhere I go, you’re always right there with me. I flirted with you all my life. Even kissed you once or twice… But clearly I was not ready. … Oh death, really I’m not ready, no no.”

Vic opened for Jonathan Richman at the Bowery Ballroom in NYC in June. He seemed as cantankerous as ever and full of life. After his set, he hung out with some younger men at the back of the room and talked about partying after the show. He seemed content, not as angry or hurting as in the past. Perhaps he had just learned to hide it better.

R.I.P., Vic.